Every June celebrates National Safety Month.

This is a month-long celebration that began in 1996, and continues every year to promote the importance of safety. One of the goals is to raise awareness about safety culture in the workplace, on the road, at home, and across communities. The event is organized by the National Safety Council and it endeavors to reduce preventable injuries and death.

This year, National Safety Month centers on four distinct topics: Hazard Recognition, Slips, Trips and Falls, Fatigue and Impairment.

Let us explore in our article what each of these topics means to you so that you may be better prepared to protect yourself and your loved ones.

Hazard Recognition

Industrial work sites can be extremely hazardous, but so can air conditioned office buildings.

Here are several tips to reduce common office hazards this National Safety Month:

  • Keep hallways and door openings clutter-free.
  • When reaching for high places, use step ladders instead of office chairs.
  • Employees, customers, and the general public need clear lines of vision when moving through hallways and aisles, and around corners. Arranging for maximum clarity can help reduce sight hazards.
  • Consider carpeting common walking areas, especially near doorways, to help eliminate slippery surfaces.

Slips, Trips, and Falls

Did you know falling is the third leading cause of unintentional injury-related deaths in the United States every year?  Always try to plan ahead, assess any risks, and use the right equipment you are trained on at work. There may be other ways to perform necessary tasks other than taking dangerous falling risks.

Fatigue

We know everyone gets tired, and sleep is almost always the best remedy. Many adults do not get enough sleep, however, and the resulting fatigue can cause safety risks. According to a National Health Interview Survey, about one-third of all American adults average less than six hours of sleep a night.

Impairment

Unfortunately, no level of impairment is safe. Traditionally, impairment applies to drugs and alcohol, but in recent years legally prescribed medications have introduced serious safety issues, particularly opioids. They are powerful, highly addictive and greatly increase the risk of injury and death, even when used as prescribed. If you are an employer, make sure to work with your employees to:

  • Establish a clear, written policy on prescription medication
  • Educate workers
  • Train supervisors
  • Offer an employee assistance program
  • Consider drug testing

We know this article may raise more questions that it answers. Do not wait to contact a member of our experienced, local legal defense team to schedule a free case evaluation to address your concerns. We are here for you and your family 24 hours a day.