Are your kids enrolled in different summer camps? After a year of social distancing and isolation, many children, and their parents, may be especially looking forward to summer camp this year. The pandemic, however, is not yet over, and children under 12 cannot be vaccinated yet, so summer camp is not likely to look like it did in 2019. 

Some states have not yet released guidance for camps, and after the CDC’s guidance in April was criticized for being overly strict, the agency has promised new recommendations for summer camps soon. No one, however, knows exactly when that guidance will be released. That may be one reason why it can be so important to read the rules for your particular camps carefully. 

Generally, overnight camps are trying to offer experiences as close to normal as possible by creating “bubbles.” Campers and staff will get tested shortly before arriving, upon arrival, and again 5-7 days later. During that time, they will only interact with their cabin-mates and counselors, and may be required to wear masks. For camps lasting longer than a week, each “bubble” may combine after everyone has tested negative. 

For day camps, which cannot create effective bubbles, children may be required to wear masks at all times, except when eating, drinking, or swimming. These guidelines, however, may change as the CDC and local governments ease mask requirements. 

Our experienced team of local attorneys is here to answer your questions. We know local experience matters! For more information, please reach out to our office. You may call, chat, or contact us at any time. Put our team to work for you!